Dental Care in Edmonton: Look After Your Teeth

At Heritage Dental Centre in Edmonton, we want to make sure that you have optimal dental care. Continue reading to learn how to look after your teeth.

1. X-Rays

When X-rays pass through your mouth during a dental exam, more X-rays are absorbed by the denser parts (such as teeth and bone) than by soft tissues (such as cheeks and gums) before striking the film or X-ray sensor (in the case of digital X-rays). This creates an image on the radiograph. Teeth appear lighter because fewer X-rays penetrate to reach the film. Cavities and the resultant bone loss from gum disease appear as darker areas because of more X-ray penetration. The interpretation of these X-rays allows the dentist to safely and accurately detect hidden abnormalities.


How often dental X-rays (radiographs) should be taken depends on the patient's individual health needs. It is important to recognize that just as each patient is different from the next, so should the scheduling of X-ray exams be individualized for each patient. Your medical and dental history will be reviewed and your mouth examined before a decision is made to take X-rays of your teeth.


The schedule for needing radiographs at recall visits varies according to your age, risk for disease and signs and symptoms. Recent films may be needed to detect new cavities, or to determine the status of gum disease or for evaluation of growth and development. Children may need X-rays more often than adults. This is because their teeth and jaws are still developing and because their teeth are more likely to be affected by tooth decay than those of adults.

2. Denture Care

Often times people are missing teeth due to periodontal disease, decay, trauma or genetic defects. Dentists will coordinate with a lab to create dentures, or false teeth, to replace the missing teeth. Dentures can replace a few missing teeth on the same arch (partial denture) or it can replace all the teeth in an arch (complete denture).

There are many benefits to a properly fitted denture. Some examples include:

  • Improved ability for the patient to chew food.
  • Improvement to collapsed facial features. When the missing teeth are replaced by a denture the cheeks and lips are better supported.
  • Improved speech. Patients are better able to pronounce certain sounds.
  • Improved mental well being of the patient. Patients feel better about themselves when their esthetics and speech are improved.

Dentures today are created using acrylic resins and porcelain to give the patient a natural appearance. Acrylic resin is strong and wears well. Porcelain, which strongly resembles the appearance of natural tooth enamel, is used mainly on the upper teeth as they are more visible. However, because porcelain will wear and damage natural teeth, porcelain can only be used in dentures where they will not occlude with any natural teeth.

Denture Care

It is important for patients who wear dentures to be diligent with their oral care. Daily brushing is necessary to remove food particles and debris. Regular checkups with the dentist are equally important as the dentist will clean the dentures to remove any plaque in order to prevent any gum disease. A dentist may use an ultrasonic cleaner to remove any tarter that has accumulated over time. These regular checkups will also allow the dentist to make any adjustments to the denture ensuring a comfortable fit.

Cleaning a Denture

Fill the sink with water and place a washcloth at the bottom of the sink. Brush the denture over the filled sink. This way, should the denture fall, it will land in the water and not crack.


Make sure to use cool or room temperature water. Hot water may cause the false teeth or acrylic to warp.


Gently hold the denture and use a soft bristled toothbrush. Dentures should be brushed with either soap and water or a mild abrasive toothpaste. To avoid scratching or breaking the denture, do not use abrasive chemicals or highly abrasive pastes or hard bristled toothbrushes.

Dentures

Once the denture has been brushed clean, soak them overnight in a denture cleanser. These cleansers will remove debris in hard to reach places and freshen the denture by removing odor-causing bacteria. Make sure to thoroughly rinse the cleanser off before wearing the denture.


When cleaning your natural teeth and gums it is important to use a separate toothbrush than the one used to clean the denture. If the patient is edentulous, a soft washcloth can be used to clean the gums.

3. Emergency Care

A knocked out tooth or bitten tongue can cause panic in any parent, but quick thinking and staying calm are the best ways to approach such common dental emergencies and prevent additional unnecessary damage and costly dental restoration. This includes taking measures such as application of cold compresses to reduce swelling, and of course, contacting our office as soon as possible.

4. Prevention Tips for Children

Infants

The first dental appointment for children should be after the child turns six months of age and before their first birthday. The reason for such an early appointment is because the primary (first) teeth should have started to erupt and this is the time to detect anything of concern. Some of the issues that could cause problems are thumb-sucking and baby bottle tooth decay.

Thumb-Sucking

Children find comfort from sucking a thumb, finger or a pacifier. This is normal. However, if the infant or child is doing this often, it can cause malformed teeth and an irregular bite pattern.


Thumb-sucking engages powerful muscles that can alter the shape of the palate. This, in turn, can affect the position of the teeth and lips. If the child continues to suck their thumb or fingers after the four anterior teeth have erupted, conditions can worsen and it may require surgery to be corrected.


It is recommended that if by four years of age a child is still sucking their thumb or fingers you should seek the advice of your dental professional.

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby bottle decay is caused by sugars found in breast milk, formula and in juices. Natural sugars found in milk and 100% fruit juice will have the same effect as refined sugar on the teeth. When an infant drinks from their bottle, the bacteria in their mouth will mix with the sugars from the drink. This mixture creates a mild acid that will attack the enamel of their teeth and form cavities. We can control this damage by managing how much sugar is given to the infant and controlling how long it stays there. Children that go to bed with a bottle of milk or juice are at an increased risk of decay. The sugars will pool in their saliva and have all night to work on destroying the outer layer (enamel) of the teeth. It is also risky to give a child juice between meals as this is just a continuous coating of sugar on the teeth throughout the day. In order to avoid baby bottle tooth decay, do not allow a baby to nurse on a bottle of milk or juice before going to sleep. Water is also the best choice to give between meals. Do not dip pacifiers into sweet substances and, as early as possible, teach your child to drink from a cup. Baby bottle tooth decay can interfere with the proper formation of the permanent teeth if it is left untreated.

Teething

Babies can begin teething as early as three to four months of age. This is a period where the teeth begin to sequentially erupt. The pain that children feel varies. Some babies can become irritable while others donʼt seem to be bothered at all. Symptoms of teething are swollen gums, drooling, crankiness, difficulty sleeping and loss of appetite. You can help to alleviate some of the symptoms of teething by gently massaging your childʼs gums with a clean finger, a small cool spoon or a wet gauze pad. A teething ring may also help. The ADA (American Dental Association) and CDA (Canadian Dental Association) also report that if your child shows rashes, diarrhea and/or fever call your physician. These are NOT normal symptoms of teething.

Primary and Permanent Teeth

Most children at three years of age have 20 primary teeth. These teeth eventually get replaced by permanent teeth by the time the child turns 12 years of age. Somewhere between the age of 17-31, the four permanent molars, also known as wisdom teeth, may emerge.


It is very important that a childʼs primary teeth are kept healthy because they will determine the placement for the permanent teeth. If the primary teeth become diseased or do not properly erupt it can alter the growth pattern for the permanent teeth, leading to overcrowding.

Brushing

Cleaning Your Baby’s Mouth Before Teeth Erupt

It is important to start cleaning a childʼs mouth before they even have any teeth. This is essential for two reasons. It develops a habit of keeping the mouth clean and provides a clean and healthy environment for the primary teeth to erupt. The idea is to wipe all the gums. Firstly, with the baby in a comfortable lying position, make sure you can see clearly into the baby's mouth. With a clean damp washcloth over your finger, wipe the baby's gums. You can also buy special infant toothbrushes that fit right over your finger. Do not use toothpaste as the baby may swallow it. Once the teeth have grown through the gums you can clean the teeth with a child size, soft bristled toothbrush and a pea size amount of toothpaste. It is important to teach the child to spit out the paste when finished. It is recommended to avoid toothpastes containing fluoride on children under the age of two.

Proper Technique for Brushing Your Childʼs Primary Teeth

Use a soft bristled toothbrush with rounded edges. Make sure the toothbrush allows you to reach all the way to the back of the mouth. Hold your toothbrush at a 45 degree angle to your teeth. The bristles of the brush should be directed towards the gum line. Brush all three surfaces of the teeth, the chewing surface, the cheek side and the tongue side. Brushing your teeth should take a minimum of two minutes to complete. Most people will miss the same spots repeatedly. To avoid this, change up your usual brushing pattern. The Canadian Dental Association and the American Dental Association recommend that you replace your toothbrush every three months.

Toothaches

Toothaches can be common in young children. Sometimes, toothaches are caused by erupting teeth, but they also could indicate a serious problem.


You can safely relieve a small child's toothache without the aid of medication by rinsing the mouth with a solution of warm water and table salt. If the pain doesn't subside, acetaminophen may be used. If such medications don't help, contact your dentist immediately.

Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral found in food and most drinking water systems. Fluoride is important to our oral health because it makes our teeth more resistant to decay. If your drinking water does not have acceptable levels of fluoride there are supplements that your dentist could recommend. A fluoride toothpaste sometimes is not enough. Too much fluoride can also pose a problem. Dental fluorosis, a condition that can affect the look of the tooth is the result when too high of an amount of fluoride is ingested in early childhood.

Injuries

Most children who have a trauma to their mouth, jaws and teeth are due to accidental play, whether it is playing a sport or by putting foreign objects in their mouth. In order to prevent injury to the jaw, teeth, lips and gums it is strongly recommended that during playtime children are adequately supervised and that children wear mouth guards while participating in sports. Mouth guards are small and fit securely around the childʼs teeth and prevent injury to the whole mouth. Childrenʼs mouth guards are small and when first inserted into the mouth they mold to the childʼs teeth. In the case of a tooth that is avulsed (knocked out), hold the tooth by the crown and try to re-implant it into the mouth. Never touch the tooth by the root. Then bite on a clean cloth or gauze to hold the tooth in place and go directly to your dental office. If the tooth cannot be put back into the socket, submerge the tooth in saline, cold milk or the victim's own saliva and go to the dental office. This is an emergency visit and you should not have to wait long to be seen. The longer you wait, the less likely it is that the tooth can be re-implanted into the socket. When there is an injury in your mouth make sure you rinse your mouth to remove any blood or particles. In order to control the swelling, place a cold cloth or cold compress on the cheek near the injury site. If the tooth is fractured, do a warm water rinse and apply a cold pack or compress. The cold pack along with Ibuprofen will help to control the swelling.


To repair a fractured tooth the dentist will first determine if the fracture is minor or severe and if the nerve is exposed or damaged. In less severe cases, it could be as simple as just adding some filling material to restore the look of the tooth and smooth out any sharp edges. In a severe case the dentist will have to decide if the tooth can be saved. If a child has a primary (baby) tooth that is loose it is often just a case of the roots dissolving as the permanent teeth come in. These teeth usually come out on their own or when a child bites into something hard, such as an apple. If the tooth is very loose you can encourage the child to wiggle it until it falls out. Never yank the tooth as it may break and become infected. If the primary tooth is loose due to injury, apply a cold compress to the mouth and gums to lessen the pain and swelling. Contact your dentist immediately. The dentist will have to take an X-ray to determine the extent of the damage. Braces and retainers can sometimes cause irritation. Placing a small piece of orthodontic wax, gauze or cotton over the wire tip can provide relief. If a piece of the retainer or braces is stuck into the soft tissue, do not detach it yourself. Contact the dental office immediately.

Sealants

The premolar and molar teeth are the largest teeth in the mouth. They have a larger surface area and have several grooves and pits on the chewing surface. These grooves can be deep and are a prime place for plaque and acid to build up and cause cavities. It is for this reason that many dentists will suggest applying sealants, especially on young children. A sealant is a coating that is applied to the chewing surface of the teeth creating a smooth surface to act as a barricade protecting it from decay.

5. Women and Tooth Care

Women have special needs when it comes to their oral health. That's because the physical changes they undergo through life - things like menstruation, pregnancy and childbirth, breast-feeding and menopause - cause many changes in the body, some harmful to teeth and gums.


Lesions and ulcers, dry sockets, as well as swollen gums, can sometimes occur during surges in a woman's hormone levels. These periods would be a prime time to visit the dentist. Birth control pills have been shown to increase the risk of gingivitis, and hormone replacement therapy has been shown to cause bleeding and swollen gums. Gum disease can also present a higher risk for premature births.


Some research has shown that women may be more likely to develop dry mouth, eating disorders, jaw problems such as temporomandibular joint disorders and facial pain - all of which can be difficult from a physical and emotional standpoint.


Taking care of your oral health is essential, and can go a long way to helping you face the physical changes in your body over the years.

6. Seniors and Oral Health

More and more people are avoiding the need for dentures as they grow older, going against the notion that false teeth are a normal part of growing older.


In fact, there's usually no reason for you NOT to keep your teeth your entire life, providing you maintain a healthy balanced diet and practice good oral hygiene.


Another desirable side effect of good oral hygiene: avoiding more serious problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even stroke. Indeed, medical research is beginning to show that a healthy mouth equates to a healthy body and a longer life.

Dexterity and Arthritis

People who suffer from arthritis or other problems of dexterity may find it difficult and painful to practice good oral hygiene.


Thankfully, industry has responded with ergonomically designed devices such as toothbrushes and floss holders that make it easier to grasp and control.

You can also use items around the house to help you. Inserting the handle of your toothbrush into a small rubber ball, or extending the handle by attaching a small piece of plastic or popsicle stick may also do the trick.

Floss can also be tied into a tiny loop on either side, making it easier to grasp and control the floss with your fingers.

7. Nutrition and Your Teeth

It has long been known that good nutrition and a well-balanced diet is one of the best defenses for your oral health. Providing your body with the right amount of vitamins and minerals helps your teeth and gums - as well as your immune system - stay strong and ward off infection, decay and disease.

Harmful acids and bacteria in your mouth are left behind from eating foods high in sugar and carbohydrates. These include carbonated beverages, some kinds of fruit juices and many kinds of starch foods like pasta, bread and cereal.

Children's Nutrition and Teeth

Good eating habits that begin in early childhood can go a long way to ensuring a lifetime of good oral health.


Children should eat foods rich in calcium and other kinds of minerals, as well as a healthy balance of the essential food groups like vegetables, fruits, dairy products, poultry and meat. Fluoride supplements may be helpful if you live in a community without fluoridated water, but consult with our office first. (Be aware that sugars are even found in some kinds of condiments, as well as fruits and even milk.)

Allowing your children to eat excessive amounts of junk food (starches and sugars) - including potato chips, cookies, crackers, soda, even artificial fruit rollups and granola bars - only places them at risk for serious oral health problems, as well as obesity, osteoporosis and diabetes. The carbonation found in soda, for example, can actually erode tooth enamel. Encourage your child to use a straw when drinking soda; this will help keep at least some of the carbonated beverage away from the teeth.

Smart Snacks for Healthy Teeth

There's no discounting the importance of continuing a healthy balanced diet throughout your adult life.


What's wrong with sugary snacks, anyway? Sugary snacks taste so good — but they aren't so good for your teeth or your body. The candies, cakes, cookies and other sugary foods that kids love to eat between meals can cause tooth decay. Some sugary foods have a lot of fat in them, too. Kids who consume sugary snacks eat many different kinds of sugar every day, including table sugar (sucrose) and corn sweeteners (fructose). Starchy snacks can also break down into sugars once they're in your mouth.

How Do Sugars Attack Your Teeth?

Invisible germs called bacteria live in your mouth all the time. Some of these bacteria form a sticky material called plaque on the surface of the teeth. When you put sugar in your mouth, the bacteria in the plaque gobble up the sweet stuff and turn it into acids. These acids are powerful enough to dissolve the hard enamel that covers your teeth. That's how cavities get started. If you don't eat much sugar, the bacteria can't produce as much of the acid that eats away enamel.

How Can I "Snack Smart" To Protect Myself from Tooth Decay?

Before you start munching on a snack, ask yourself what's in the food you've chosen. Is it loaded with sugar? If it is, think again. Another choice would be better for your teeth. And keep in mind that certain kinds of sweets can do more damage than others. Gooey or chewy sweets spend more time sticking to the surface of your teeth. Because sticky snacks stay in your mouth longer than foods that you quickly chew and swallow, they give your teeth a longer sugar bath. You should also think about when and how often you eat snacks. Do you nibble on sugary snacks many times throughout the day, or do you usually just have dessert after dinner? Damaging acids form in your mouth every time you eat a sugary snack. The acids continue to affect your teeth for at least 20 minutes before they are neutralized and can't do any more harm. So, the more times you eat sugary snacks during the day, the more often you feed bacteria the fuel they need to cause tooth decay.


If you eat sweets, it's best to eat them as dessert after a main meal instead of several times a day between meals. Whenever you eat sweets — in any meal or snack — brush your teeth well with a fluoride toothpaste afterward.


When you're deciding about snacks, think about:

  • The number of times a day you eat sugary snacks
  • How long the sugary food stays in your mouth
  • The texture of the sugary food (Chewy? Sticky?)

If you snack after school, before bedtime or other times during the day, choose something without a lot of sugar or fat. There are lots of tasty, filling snacks that are less harmful to your teeth — and the rest of your body — than foods loaded with sugars and low in nutritional value. Snack smart!

Low-fat choices like raw vegetables, fresh fruits or whole grain crackers or bread are smart choices. Eating the right foods can help protect you from tooth decay and other diseases. Next time you reach for a snack, pick a food from the list inside or make up your own menu of non-sugary, low-fat snack foods from the basic food groups.

How can you snack smart? Be choosy! Pick a variety of foods from these groups:

Fresh fruits and raw vegetables

  • Berries
  • Oranges
  • Grapefruit
  • Melons
  • Pineapple
  • Pears
  • Tangerines
  • Broccoli
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Cucumbers
  • Tomatoes
  • Unsweetened fruit and vegetable juices
  • Canned fruits in natural juices

Meat, nuts and seeds

  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Sliced meats
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Nuts

Others

  • Pizza
  • Tacos

Remember to:

  • Choose sugary foods less often
  • Avoid sweets between meals
  • Eat a variety of low or non-fat foods from the basic groups
  • Brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste after snacks and meals

Grains

  • Bread
  • Plain bagels
  • Unsweetened cereals
  • Unbuttered popcorn
  • Tortilla chips (baked, not fried)
  • Pretzels (low-salt)
  • Pasta
  • Plain crackers

Milk and dairy products

  • Low or non-fat milk
  • Low or non-fat yogurt
  • Low or non-fat cheese
  • Low or non-fat cottage cheese

Note to parents

The foods listed on this page have not all been tested for their decay-causing potential. However, knowledge to date indicates that they are less likely to promote tooth decay than are some of the heavily sugared foods children often eat between meals.


Candy bars aren't the only culprits. Foods such as pizza, breads and hamburger buns may also contain sugars. Check the label. The new food labels identify sugars and fats on the Nutrition Facts panel on the package. Keep in mind that brown sugar, honey, molasses and syrups also react with bacteria to produce acids, just as refined table sugar does. These foods also are potentially damaging to teeth.

Your child's meals and snacks should include a variety of foods from the basic food groups, including fruits and vegetables; grains, including breads and cereals; milk and dairy products; and meat, nuts and seeds. Some snack foods have greater nutritional value than others and will better promote your child's growth and development. However, be aware that even some fresh fruits, if eaten in excess, may promote tooth decay. Children should brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste after snacks and meals. (So should you!)

Please note: These general recommendations may need to be adapted for children on special diets because of diseases or conditions that interfere with normal nutrition.

8. Flossing

What is flossing?

Flossing is a method for removing bacteria and other debris that cannot be reached by a toothbrush. It generally entails a very thin piece of synthetic cord you insert and move up and down between the sides of two adjoining teeth.

Why is flossing important?

Many dentists believe that flossing is the single most important weapon against plaque. In any event, daily flossing is an excellent and proven method for complementing your brushing routine and helping to prevent cavities, periodontal disease and other dental problems later in life. It also increases blood circulation in your gums. Floss removes plaque and debris that stick to your teeth and gums.

How often to floss

Flossing is the act of removing plaque and debris from below the gum line and between the teeth and gums. Flossing is the key to preventing plaque buildup, cavities and periodontal disease. It also works to improve circulation in the gum tissue. It is recommended to floss daily. Flossing should be done prior to brushing and should take no longer than three minutes to complete.


Common methods for flossing are the spool method and the loop method.

Spool method

For both of these techniques you would break off a piece of floss about 18 inches long. With the spool method, you would wind the majority of the floss around the middle finger and the remaining floss around the same finger on the opposite hand. It is this finger that would take up the floss as it gets used.


Once you place the floss between the teeth, you would wrap it around the tooth making a “C” shape. Then push the floss up and down making sure it goes below the gum line. This is area that your toothbrush cannot reach but where the most bacteria accumulates.

Loop method

This method is used by people who have trouble with manual dexterity or small children. Once you break off 18 inches of floss, you would then tie the ends to form a loop. By placing all of your fingers except the thumbs, within the loop, you are able to guide the floss using index fingers and the thumbs. For the lower teeth use the index fingers and for the upper teeth the thumbs would guide the floss. With both of these methods, it is important to floss gently ensuring that you do not cut the gums. For the first few days the gums may feel a little tender and sometimes bleed. This improves within three to four days.

9. Mouth Rinses

There are two types of mouth rinses. These are cosmetic and therapeutic. Cosmetic mouth rinses, or mouth wash as they are sometimes referred as, mainly serve the purpose of freshening breath. The act of gargling and swishing the rinse in the mouth will remove some bacteria and debris. A therapeutic mouth rinse will do all of this but it also contains fluoride and has been proven to reduce plaque buildup, fight cavities and help to prevent gum disease (gingivitis).

It is important to note that mouth rinses, even therapeutic rinses, are only somewhat effective. This should be part of the daily routine in conjunction with flossing and brushing. Regular rinsing with water and a fluoride toothpaste is just as effective as a therapeutic mouth rinse.

10. Sealants

What Are Sealants?

The premolar and molar teeth are the largest teeth in the mouth. They have a larger surface area and have several grooves and pits on the chewing surface. These grooves can be deep and are a prime place for plaque and acid to build up and cause cavities. It is for this reason that many dentists will suggest applying sealants, especially on young children. A sealant is a coating that is applied to the chewing surface of the teeth creating a smooth surface to act as a barricade protecting it from decay.

Applying a sealant is a quick and easy procedure. It does not involve any anesthetic. After the teeth are cleaned, a chemical liquid is applied to the tooth. This will etch the tooth surface making it feel a little rough. After a few seconds the etching solution is rinsed away. The etching allows the sealant to bond with the tooth. The sealant is then applied in a liquid form and a light is applied to the surface of the tooth to speed up the hardening process. Sealants can be reapplied every 5 to 10 years. Sealants are very effective in preventing decay and in some cases can prevent additional damage where decay has already begun.

11. A Tip for the Sweet Tooth

Everyone knows that sweets are bad for your teeth. But, did you know that the amount of sweet food you eat is not as important as the length of time your teeth are exposed to sweets? Eat sweets at mealtime rather than between meals. The amount of saliva produced at that time will help protect your teeth.

If you cannot avoid sweets between meals, choose something with less sugar like nuts and seeds, peanut butter, popcorn or plain yogurt. Sticky sweets that stay in your mouth for longer periods of time like toffee or hard candies should be avoided as snacks.

Vitamins, Minerals and Your Teeth

Just like our bodies, our teeth and gums need certain essential vitamins and minerals to stay healthy and strong. Babies, children and adults all need ample amounts of the minerals calcium and phosphorous, and the vitamins A, C and D to ensure proper tooth development and strength.


Calcium, aided by phosphorous and vitamin D, is the main component of teeth and bones. It's what helps keep them strong. Vitamin A is necessary for the formation of tooth enamel, and vitamin C is essential for healthy gums.


Nursing mothers should keep in mind that their diet may influence the growth of the newly-forming teeth of their baby. A nursing mother's diet should include foods from all of the food groups.


An adequate intake of the proper vitamins and minerals helps in the development of healthy teeth. A lack or absence of these minerals can lead to disease.


Fluoride is an important mineral for tooth decay prevention. Fluoride strengthens the enamel of young developing teeth, and acts with calcium and phosphorous to restore and harden enamel in mature teeth. Fortunately for our teeth, fluoride has been added to almost half of the drinking water in Canada. If your drinking water comes from a well, you may want to have your water tested for the presence of natural fluoride. Contact your local health unit for more information.


As with the overall health of our body, a good diet is the best way to ensure dental nutrition. Strong teeth need a variety of whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables and lean meats, in addition to milk products. Tooth-healthy snacks also include nuts and seeds, peanut butter, cheese, plain yogurt and popcorn.

Heritage Dental Centre

2118 109 St NW

Edmonton, AB  T6J 7C1

Hours

Monday 08:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Tuesday 08:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Wednesday 08:00 AM - 07:00 PM

Thursday 08:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Friday 08:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Saturday 08:00 AM - 02:00 PM

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